8 Flavor Profile Ideas to Make Your Wild Alaska Pollock Go Global


Inspiration from Around the World to Elevate Your Fish

We’re all looking for variety when it comes to our culinary repertoire, and if you are a fellow fish-lover who spends a lot of time in the kitchen, then you’re probably seeking new ways to mix up your mealtime seafood offerings. The best part about mild, white fish such as wild Alaska pollock is that it is so versatile it really takes on the personality and flavor profile of whatever seasoning and preparation method you choose. That’s what makes this sustainable species so appealing from both a chef’s perspective and from the perspective of the lucky dinner guest who gets to enjoy this delectable fish.

Going global with your fish dishes seems intimidating to many of us who love to eat but aren’t so adventurous or confident when it comes to cooking. But many global and ethnic dishes aren’t really difficult to make at all, they just seem scary because some of the ingredients are items you don’t necessarily use on a daily basis or have stored in the back of your pantry. But rest assured — these dishes are easy to make, even easier to love, and are so good you could eat wild Alaska Pollock every day and never get bored.

Laos Style Wild Alaska Pollock

Crispy fried shallots really take wild Alaska pollock to the next level with this dish, and the lemongrass dressing gives it a major flavor infusion. The baked fish is simple but satisfying, but what really sets this dish apart is the way it is assembled. Once the fish has chilled, pile it in a lettuce cup, topped with crispy shallots, lemongrass dressing, fresh cilantro, mint leaves and red onion. The dish is refreshing but full of nuanced flavors that will make you rethink all the ways to enjoy wild Alaskan pollock.

Indian Style Fish Mappas Featuring Wild Alaska Pollock  

Fans of Indian cuisine know that a really good fish curry is hard to beat, and wild Alaska pollock is one the best fish to use for this indulgent dish. Pollock is firm but tender, making it perfect for a fish stew or curry dish such as this one. And it’s easy to make, and easy to adapt based on your preferences and what you have on hand. It also happens to be such a quick dish to whip up; once the sauce and veggies are simmering in the coconut curry you only cook the fish for 5-8 minutes.  

Korean Style Wild Alaska Pollock Pancake

Pollock pancakes, otherwise known as Dongtaejeon, are one of the most common side dishes for special occasions in Korea, and once you try them you’ll know why. You’ll love this recipe because of the intense aroma that floods your kitchen when you make it, and because it requires only six simple ingredients. The ingredients and steps in this recipe are similar to making fish sticks, minus the breadcrumbs — first you thinly slice the fish, then season it, then coat it in flour, then coat it in a beaten egg, then pan-fry it in vegetable oil. And to finish it off, a simple dipping sauce of soy sauce and vinegar is key.

Irish Style Wild Alaska Pollock

While many of us are familiar with Asian cuisines and Italian recipes, Irish cooking is a bit more of a mystery. But if this Irish roasted pollock is any indication, we really like Irish cuisine. The dish is so simple yet so flavorful, and dare we say it, it’s even healthy. The fish is served alongside roasted leeks and red potatoes, and everything is seasoned with a classic olive oil, garlic and thyme marinade. 6 ingredients, 30 minutes, and one pan is all you need to whip up this easy and delicious Irish dinner.

Canary Islands Style Mojo Wild Alaska Pollock and Potatoes

The Canary Islands are an Atlantic territory of Spain, located off the coast of northwestern Africa, so as you can imagine, the local cuisine of these islands is a mix of several cultures, flavors and cooking styles. This traditional (but with a healthier spin) recipe uses boiled potatoes and fillets cooked in a red mojo sauce. The sauce seems intimidating but it’s actually easy to make; all you need are canned tomatoes, roasted red peppers, cumin, paprika and garlic. The fish only takes about 5-6 minutes to cook, and the sauce is so good you’ll definitely want to soak up the extras with your boiled potatoes.

Mexican Style Wild Alaska Pollock

Most of the time when we think of fish tacos or Mexican fish dishes, we think of tilapia or cod, but sustainable, wild Alaska pollock is perfect for this Mexican fish casserole dish. It has all of the Mexican ingredients you know and love — think onions, peppers, garlic, corn, black beans, tomatoes and salsa. All you need to do is sauté those ingredients together and then cook the pollock in the sauce for about 15 minutes, or until the fish is opaque and flakes easily with a fork. Serve your fish over rice, or with tortillas to make the absolute best fish tacos.

Thai Style Wild Alaska Pollock Curry

Thai curry dishes are notoriously spicy, saucy and oh-so-good. And generally speaking we wait until we visit a Thai restaurant to indulge in our favorite fish curry, but not after you try this recipe. It’s so easy to make, it takes less than an hour start-to-finish, and it looks like a professional grade, restaurant-quality meal. Plus one serving has less than 500 calories despite what you might think about the addition of coconut cream to the curry. And wild Alaska pollock is the perfect fish here, because it can be pan-fried quickly (only one minute per side) and the fish is firm enough to hold together nicely even after it is sautéed in the curry sauce.

Wild Alaska Pollock A La Plancha

To cook a dish “a la plancha” is to grill it on a flat top grill or metal plate, a cooking technique common in Spanish cuisine. In some cuisines it can also mean to pan-fry a dish in a skillet, and according to fish experts and seafood aficionados, this is the best way to prepare wild Alaska pollock. The fish is perfectly firm but tender and mild making it perfectly equipped to absorb the flavors of the dish and still hold together nicely after being cooked on the grill or cast iron skillet. The seasoning in this recipe is simple — salt, pepper, olive oil and lemons — and the fish is sautéed with fresh veggies such as sweet peppers, onions and potatoes. The dish itself is quick, easy and healthy, and pro tip: do not skip the toasted whole wheat bread to lap up the extra sauce, we promise it will be worth it.

Ready For Some Wild Alaskan Seafood?

By reserving your monthly seafood share, you’re helping build a more sustainable food system that’s better for humans and fish alike.